It’s Not Your Parents’ Custody Agreement

Parents are becoming increasingly creative with their child custody agreements. They believe that the usual practice of awarding primary custody to one parent and visitation to the other could be harmful to a child. The goal of non-standard custody arrangements is to minimize disruption in the child’s life and ensure that both parents have an equal role after a divorce.

5 Creative Child Custody Arrangements

If you are considering creating a non-traditional child custody agreement, perhaps these examples will spark some ideas for you to use.

  1. Retaining the marital home for the children and having the parents rotate in and out on a weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. In some instances, parents remodel the home to include more bedrooms and suites to accommodate them. Parents who have done this report on the level of stability it provides; children don’t have to move to an unfamiliar location or shuttle back and forth between parental homes.
  2. Abandoning the standard arrangement of one weeknight evening and every other weekend, changing to a mid-week overnight and a Friday through Monday weekend. This gives children ore equal amounts of time with each parent.
  3. Splitting the children’s time with each parent equally, with the children living with each parent every other week or month. This works best when parents live near each other.
  4. Having both parents remain in the family home after the divorce, with the only difference being a change to separate bedrooms. Parents who do this successfully report that it is the least disruptive for children but challenging for parents.
  5. Dividing time between both parents with one parent having the child on Mondays and Tuesday, the other on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Friday, Saturday and Sunday alternate every other week.
    This trend toward more flexible and creative custody agreements is happening across the U.S. But these schedules don’t work for everyone. For example, continuing to live with your ex, sharing meals and dividing chores all require excellent communication skills. It also requires an unwavering focus on the children’s well-being, something that is usually very difficult for divorced parents to maintain over the long haul.
    The bottom line is that the one-size-fits-all type of custody agreement is no longer the default position for parents who want to help their children thrive after divorce.

Want to Minimize Disruption to Your Child After Divorce? We Can Help.

Ae you hoping to arrive at the best possible child custody agreement? At Setzer Law Firm, our family law attorneys can help you develop the arrangement that minimizes disruption for your child, whatever the circumstances. Contact Jill and John Setzer to learn more.