Social Media in Divorce: Everyone Is Watching

Divorce on Facebook

Social media has become ever-present in many people’s lives. Facebook, Twitter, and even YouTube channels have changed the way we distribute and consume information. The social media revolution has had both positive and negative impacts but one thing is clear: it is here to stay. And one of the side effects is its growing impact on the way divorce and custody cases play out.

A great deal of stress and anxiety often comes along with divorce and custody battles. Your emotions can swing from elation to anger and back again in just a few seconds. All those kinds of feelings are completely normal, but that does not mean you should post about them on Facebook. During a family dispute, it is very important to control your reactions to bad news (and good news, for that matter). The proper outlet should rarely be social media.

Your Posts Really Mean Something

You have probably heard about how many employers in Texas and around the country now look at the social media accounts of job applicants. Well, in family law cases, lawyers do the same thing. If your wife’s or husband’s lawyer is doing a good job, you can bet that he or she will be scrutinizing your social media posts to see if there is something that could be used to weaken your position.

Think like a Judge

What you think of as a throw-away post or harmless comment that doesn’t mean much could mean a lot to a judge. In fact, when going through a divorce or custody case, a good rule of thumb is this: before you post, ask yourself what the judge might think. Here are a few things a judge might think about, which means you should think about them, too:

  • Would your post show impulsiveness or poor judgment?
  • Is it wise to post pictures of yourself out at a bar or party?
  • If you’re asking for custody of your children, would it make sense to post about how hard it can be to be a parent?
  • Is it a good idea to post photos of you and your date before the divorce is finalized?
  • Does your post reflect irresponsibility in any way?

Conclusion: Take a Moment to Breathe

Whether you’re upset or thrilled, always take a few minutes to think before you post anything on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or anywhere else. Try to post only positive messages and things that put you in a good light. That sounds like common sense, but Texas courtrooms are being filled more and more with cases that are impacted by poor social media activity.
So, before you post, think, breathe, and if you feel like you need help, call one of Texas family law attorneys for advice.